OMG: I Agree with Mark Driscoll?

Jason Micheli —  November 11, 2013 — 2 Comments

9fd2f25f6a96a760872a425d027134abI’ve read that Josef Mengele Mengele, the Nazi ‘Angel of Death,’ who was one of the chief architects of the holocaust, also had a compassionate, some say charming, side to him.

It was not rare, for example, that Mengele would act in a caring, empathetic manner towards exhausted mothers and their children.

While they waited on ramps for the train cars to come and ship them to death camps.

We’ve all got our good side, right?

No matter how rotten the lemon at least a little bit of lemonade can be made.

Of course I’m exaggerating when I draw an analogy from the above to the (in)famous Seattle pastor, Mark Driscoll. Such a comparison is shockingly insensitive, snarky to the extreme, wildly overblown, willfully ignorant of the larger context and aimed only at scoring rhetorical points for the sake of your attention.

In short, it’s exactly the kind of sarcastic parallel Mark Driscoll would draw up himself.

And to be honest, I wonder if therein lies my love-hate-hate-hate-hate-stomach-love relationship with Mark Driscoll?

Minus his cro-magnon misogyny, Driscoll practices the very same blunt, acerbic rhetoric of which my heart is fond. As some of you, dear blog readers, have pointed out I can come across as an a@%hole on occasion and a quick Google search will show that that’s the consensus on brother Mark.

So maybe what I don’t like about Mark Driscoll is what I don’t like about myself.

Or, even more intriguing, is what I don’t like about Mark Driscoll what I DO LIKE about myself?

Whichever the answer, whenever I think of Jesus’ command to love our enemies…Driscoll makes the top ten.

A while back I attempted to read Mark Driscoll’s ebook on fatherhood in a spirit of openness and charity and blog about it. I think I managed one non-snarky post before the skuvbalon hit the fan.

Well, I’m doing some penance.

Mark Driscoll has a new book out: A Call to Resurgence: Will Christianity have a Funeral or a Future?

If you can tune out the page % given over to homosexuality and Barack Obama (I’m no liberal but WTF?), there’s actually solid nuggets of bible wisdom in here, delivered up in true, tell-it-like-it-is Driscoll fashion.

Here’s one on the lack of generosity churches tolerate from their would-be Jesus followers:

“Next time you are in a store, imagine that, instead of a cash register, there was a bucket and a sign that read, “Pay Whatever You Want and If You Don’t Want to Pay Anything, That’s Fine Too.” 

How long do you think that store would remain in business? 

That is the business model of the church. Unlike the government, which simply takes money from you, or an actual business, which will have you arrested if you do not pay for a good or service you receive, the church depends entirely on generosity. But the statistics reveal that most professing Christians are not generous givers:  

More than one out of four professing American Protestants given away $0. 

The median annual giving for a Christian is $200- just over half a percent of after tax income. 

About 5% of Christians provide 60% of the money to churches and religious groups. 

20% of Christians account for 86% of all giving. 

Among Protestants, 10% of evangelicals, 28% of mainline folk, 33% of fundamentalists and 40% of liberal Protestants give $0.00. 

But-

Jesus devoted roughly 25% of his words in the Gospels to our use of money.

 

 

Jason Micheli

Posts

2 responses to OMG: I Agree with Mark Driscoll?

  1. I think a comparison of Mengel to Christian mission is useful. In example, there is a wave of North American congregations engaged in the Zero hunger campaign in Guatemala. The elites of Guatemala have teamed up with the government and international donors to promote hunger campaign in the worst hit areas of the country where there is a dramatic increase in malnutrition.

    The issue is that this hunger is a result of a trinity of threats to the long term sustainability in the region. 1. Gold Mining, 2. Mono-cropping (largely for bio-fuels and 3. Hydro-eclectrics. Many of the same donors are invested in gold and energy companies.

    While a clear and documented system of exploitation runs wild, some North American Christians hold the hands of little children as the long term sustainability of their ancestral lands is comprised.

    Great job Jason to continue to raise critical questions. Jesus asked questions….so should we. 🙂

  2. The amount people give to their churches does not include what they give to other non-profit organizations or how they donate their time. I can only speak for myself, but I don’t have a lot of trust in how my church uses the funds it is given, so I do not give as much as I would like. You might respond, “find another church.” Fair point, but I’ve been a member of my UMC for 10 years and I have relationships there that I like. So, I don’t want another church. But that doesn’t mean that I trust my church with a lot of my giving.

Leave a Reply

Text formatting is available via select HTML. <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.